4 things you should be negotiating for, other than salary
Plenty of executives and career experts have spoken about the need to, and offered tips for, negotiating your way toward a higher salary. Yet what about all the other perks you should be negotiating for when you've accepted, or are considering accepting, a new job?

It goes without saying that higher-paid professionals, such as those working executive jobs or hedge fund jobs, will have a better chance at successfully negotiating for the perks listed below than will individuals working lower-paid positions. However, even if you're working an entry level accounting job, you should still consider whether or not you'd be wise to ask for at least one of the four perks listed below. You never know what help your boss can grant you unless you try!


1. Training support or classes
No matter what job you're working, no matter how skilled you are, there will always be room for improvement. One way to add to your skill set – and to your resume – is by taking adult education courses and other training classes. If you negotiate properly, you may even be able to convince your employer to foot the bill for them, too.

For example, Stacy Lindenberg, owner of a workplace development firm, recently told Forbes that some businesses even encourage their employees to go take classes and training courses outside the office on the company's dime. She noted that if you sell your employer on the benefits that the training or trip could offer to the office once you return, convincing your company to foot the bill could be an incredibly easy task to complete.

"For instance, if 
attending a conference, offer to share best practices and 
learnings with others when you return, thus benefiting more employees in 
the organization," Lindenberg explained to news outlet.


2. Regular salary reviews
Many employers won't want to lock down a specific schedule for performance or salary reviews. Yet it's in your best interest to do so – many employers schedule these reviews once-per-year, and some even less often. By negotiating for regularly scheduled reviews, you'll be putting yourself in the driver's seat and allowing for more regular opportunities toward raises. Thomas Anderson, the human resources director for Houston Community College, explained that employees should ask for reviews every nine months, or perhaps on an even more regular basis.

"Nine months would be the target," Anderson told the U.S. & World News Report. "Three months is awfully new and probably won't work, but I have seen people also try for six months."


3. The option to work-from-home, if applicable
Anderson also noted that individuals working high-level jobs – such as those working investor relations jobs or technology jobs, or those in an executive position – will be on good enough footing to request the privilege to work from home, on either a regular or sporadic basis, depending on the job.

"Ask yourself, 'How replaceable am I?'" Anderson explained, while speaking to the news outlet. "Someone at the executive level has a greater chance of receiving these types of benefits because they're not as easy to replace, and their skills are at a premium. Entry-level employees will have a more difficult time negotiating something like this."


4. Sabbatical time
Lastly, if your work is essential to a company's success, consider asking for sabbatical time, separate from vacation days. Lincoln Smith, a minister in Huntsville, Alabama, explained to Forbes how a recent sabbatical – afforded to him by the church – helped him to recover from fatigue and do his job on a stronger level.

"The biggest benefit for me was getting a chance to be free of the daily grind and recharge my batteries," Smith explained to Forbes. "We had just finished a building renovation, which I oversaw, and I was pretty worn out. The church hopefully was reenergized because I was recharged when I returned."


- previously published at onewire.com

Тэги: Career Advice